Dernière mise à jour : 29/03/2019

Adam TALLMAN

  • Post-doctorant

☎ 0643531288

✉ adam.tallman@cnrs.fr





 FORMATION ET PARCOURS PROFESSIONNEL

  • Professional career
    • 2019-present: Postdoctoral fellow. Laboratoire Dynamique du Langage, CNRS (France). "An ethnographically based documentation of Araona: a Takanan language of Bolivia".
    • 2018-2019: Postdoctoral fellow. University of Ottawa (Canada). "Ergativity and (im)perfectivity in the languages of the Amazon".
    • 2014-present: Affiliated researcher. Museo Nacional de Etnografía y Folklore de la Paz (Bolivia).
    • University Degrees
      • 2018. PhD. University of Texas at Austin. Thesis: "A Grammar of Chacobo, a southern Pano language of the northern Bolivian Amazon".
      • 2011. MA. University of Manitoba. Thesis: "Acoustic Correlates of Lenis and Fortis Stops in Manitoba-Saulteaux".
      • 2009. BA (honours). University of Manitoba. Major in Linguistics, Minor in Classical Greek.

       THÈMES DE RECHERCHE

      • Documentation and description / field methods
        • Fieldwork languages: Araona, Chacobo, Pacahuara, Aymara, Saulteaux-Ojibwe, Somali, Libyan Arabic, Caqchikel
        • Linguistic Typology
          • Constituency and wordhood
          • Clitics, Morphological autonomy, morphophonology, morphology-syntax divide
          • Tense, Aspect and Temporal distance
          • Quantitative and statistical methods
          • Languages of the Americas (esp. of Bolivia)
            • Araona (Takana, Bolivia)
            • Chácobo (Pano, Bolivia)
            • Pacahuara (Pano, Bolivia)
            • Aymara (Aymara, Bolivia)
            • Saulteaux-Ojibwe (Algonquian, Canada)

             TERRAIN

            • Araona (Takana, Bolivia). 2016 - current
            • Chácobo (Pano, Bolivia): 2011 - current
            • Saulteaux-Ojibwe (Algonquian, Manitoba, Canada): 2009-2010
            • Aymara (Aymaran, Bolivia) 2016 - current

             DISTINCTIONS OU FINANCEMENTS

            • Grants (by year awarded)
              • 2019 Endangered Languages Documentation Project - An ethnographically based linguistic documentation of Araona: a Takanan language of Bolivia (Grant#IPF0277). January 2019 - December 2020.
              • 2016 (with Professor Antoine Guillaume). l'Universite de Lyon II (France), Laboratoire Dynamique du Langage, ASLAN - Pilot study towards a project for the documentation and description of the Araona language, a Takanan language of Bolivia . August - October 2016.
              • 2014. Endangered Languages Documentation Project - Documentation of Chácobo-Pacahuara, languages of the northern Bolivian Amazon . August 2014 - August 2017 (Grant#IGS0230).
              • 2014 National Science Foundation, Documenting Endangered Languages, Doctoral Research Improvement Grant for A Grammar of Chácobo . August 2014 - August 2015.
              • Fellowships (by year awarded)
                • 2017 University of Texas at Austin PhD Fellowship, 2017-2018 ($25,000).
                • 2011 University of Texas at Austin PhD Fellowship ($15,000), 2011-2012.
                • 2010 Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Master’s Scholarship. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. ($17,500), 2010-2011.
                • 2009 University of Manitoba Graduate Fellowship ($15,000), 2009-2010.
                • Affiliations
                  • 2015-present. Appointed researcher (investigador adscrito) of the National Museum of Ethnography and Folklore (el Museo Nacional de Etnografia y Folklore; la Paz, Bolivia).

                   PARTICIPATION À PROJETS

                  • The typology of wordhood and constituency
                      This is a collaborative project between typologists, computational linguists and fieldworkers to describe and compare the results of constituency diagnostics across the languages of the world. The project involves developing a taxonomy of constituency diagnostics (morphosyntactic and phonological) and coding the results of these tests in terms of their span of application (roughly the size of the constituent they identify) and their degree of convergence with other tests. We compare the results across the languages of the study which has hitherto only involved indigenous languages of the Americas.