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mer. 02/03/2022 Audition blanche CR, Aude Noiray
14-16h
MSH-LSE

Audition blanche CR, Aude Noiray Si intéressé, contacter Aude pour le lien Zoom


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jeu. 03/03/2022 audition blanche CR CNRS Luca Ciucci
14h-16h
MSH-LSE, salle Sontage + visioconférence (voir lien ci-dessous)
Conférence de :
  • Luca Ciucci (James Cook University, Cairns)

dans le cadre DILIS

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://jcu.zoom.us/j/7722713328 Or an H.323/SIP room system: Dial: 7722713328@zmau.us ( or 7722713328@zoom.aarnet.edu.au ) or 103.122.166.56 or 103.122.166.57 Meeting ID: 7722713328


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ven. 04/03/2022 Réunion Interne
Assemblée Générale du laboratoire DDL / General Assembly of DDL laboratory
10h-12h
Bâtiment Gaïa (U. Lyon 2), salle Gaï 03
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lun. 07/03/2022 audition blanche CR CNRS Luca Ciucci
10h-12h
en visioconférence (lien ci-dessous)
Conférence de :
  • Luca Ciucci (James Cook University, Cairns)

dans le cadre DILIS

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://jcu.zoom.us/j/7722713328 Or an H.323/SIP room system: Dial: 7722713328@zmau.us ( or 7722713328@zoom.aarnet.edu.au ) or 103.122.166.56 or 103.122.166.57 Meeting ID: 7722713328


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mar. 08/03/2022 Toward "Dynamic Functional Typology": Nominalization, gender, classifiers
10h-12h
MSH-LSE, salle Elise Rivet + visioconf (link to videoconf below)
Conférence de :
  • Masayoshi Shibatani (Rice University, Kobe University, University of Tokyo)

dans le cadre DILIS

  • Link to the videoconference room
  • Link to the material


      While Functional Typology yields certain generalizations about form-function correlations, it, like a (synchronic) descriptive grammar, does not explain how a language ends up displaying such generalizations. By incorporating a diachronic perspective, the diverse marking patterns of grammatical nominalizations in Amami Ryukyuan are explained in terms of two competing economic motivations; namely, the hearer’s economy motivating innovations toward diversity in form, and the speaker’s economy driving changes toward form uniformity. This dynamicization of functional typology is also useful in understanding crosslinguistic patterns of gender- and classifier-marking, which, we contend, have been mishandled by leading researchers in the field such as Corbett (1991) for the former and Allen (1977) and Aikhenvald (2019) for the latter. In particular, we advance the claim that grammatical genders and (numeral) classifiers nominalize numerals, demonstratives, and other structures and at the same time classify what is being denoted according to the gender- and classifier-classes of the language. In other words, genders and classifiers are specifically classifying types of nominalization, while ordinary nominalizations classify minimally, if at all.


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mer. 09/03/2022 Audition blanche CR, Aude Noiray (online)
14-16h
MSH-LSE

Audition blanche CR, Aude Noiray Pour le lien me contacter.


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mar. 22/03/2022 The diversity of Mojeño Trinitario nominalization strategies
10h-12h
MSH-LSE, salle Albrecht + visioconf (link to video conf below)
Conférence de :
  • Françoise Rose (DDL)

dans le cadre DILIS

  • Link to the videoconference room
  • Link to the material


      Mojeño Trinitario (Arawak, Bolivia) shows a very large repertoire of nominalization strategies. It includes : i) 9 dedicated nominalizing suffixes on verbs; ii) an unmarked strategy where a finite clause is simply preceded by a determiner; iii) the use of a derivational suffix followed by a multifunctional classifier. This talk offers the first detailed overview of the diversity of nominalization strategies at three levels of analysis (semantic, morphosyntactic and functional) on the basis of a corpus of natural and elicited data collected by the author in the field over 15 years.


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mar. 29/03/2022 Séminaire de recherche de l'axe DiLiS
Nominal classification in Baniwa
10h-12h
MSH-LSE, salle Berty Albrecht
Conférence de :
  • Sandra Cronhamn (Lund University)

dans le cadre DILIS : Séminaire DiLiS

  • Link to the videoconference room


      In this seminar, I will present my ongoing PhD research, which is concerned with the description and analysis of the classifier system in Baniwa [bwi], an Arawak language spoken in Northwestern Amazonia. My work builds primarily on original data collected in São Gabriel da Cachoeira, AM, Brazil, in 2020. I focus mainly on the semantic, morphosyntactic and historical aspects of the system.

      Baniwa has around 50 classifiers, which are marked as suffixes and used in both derivational and inflectional functions (Ramirez (2001), Aikhenvald (2007)). Inflectional suffixes are obligatory in several morphosyntactic contexts, including on low numerals and attributive adjectives. The assignment of classifiers is flexible and mostly semantically transparent, although there are also examples of conventionalization. The analysis of agreement within the system is currently being undertaken, with inconclusive results so far due to conflicting data.

      Semantically, Baniwa classifiers are highly diverse and fill several different functions. The system contains both sortal and mensural classifiers. Among the sortal classifiers, most distinctions are shape-based, but parameters such as gender, function and configuration also play a role. The system contains a classifier with generic status, as well as a few highly specific classifiers which are only used with a very small number of nouns. Apart from varying in semantic generality/specificity, classifiers also vary greatly in their frequency of use.

      Besides being an interesting system in its own right, nominal classification in Baniwa—like in many other languages of NW Amazonia—is also interesting from a typological perspective, as it shares traits with both (typical) classifier systems on the one hand and (typical) noun class systems on the other, suggesting a possible grammaticalization path between the two (Seifart (2005), Seifart & Payne (2007), Grinevald & Seifart (2004)). I will therefore spend some time discussing the features of Baniwa classifiers from a typological perspective.

      References:

      Aikhenvald, A.Y. (2007) Classifiers in multiple environments. Baniwa of Içana/Kurripako–A North Arawak perspective. In: International Journal of American Linguistics 73(4), pp. 475-500.

      Grinevald, C. & Seifart, F. (2004) Noun classes in African and Amazonian languages: Towards a comparison. In: Linguistic Typology 8, 243–285 (2004).

      Ramirez, H. (2001) Uma Gramática do Baniwa do Içana. Ms.

      Seifart, F. (2005) The structure and use of shape-based noun classes in Miraña (North West Amazon). Nijmegen: Radboud University dissertation.

      Seifart, F. & Payne, D.L. (2007) Nominal classification in the North West Amazon: Issues in areal diffusion and typological characterization. In: International Journal of American Linguistics 73(4), pp. 381-387.


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mer. 30/03/2022 Development of phonetic complexity in bilingual children living in Lebanon
15h30-16h30
https://univ-lyon1.webex.com/meet/sophie.kern
Conférence de :
  • Nour Chami (Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth)

dans le cadre DENDY : Séminaire Bilinguisme

Children’s early phonetic development is constrained by universal biological limitations, but it is also influenced by the target language characteristics. Several studies on monolingual children have examined phonetic complexity showing its increase with age and/or lexical size as well as a gap between the actual and the targeted complexity. Moreover, the only crosslinguistic study to our knowledge showed first that languages differ in terms of phonetic complexity but also the influence of these differences on the development of children’s phonetic complexity. The aim of our study is to describe the development of phonetic complexity in multilingual children speaking Lebanese Arabic and French and/or English. Concerning methodology, we recorded spontaneous utterances of 16 Lebanese multilingual children aged between 16-30 months. Recordings lasted 30 minutes per child and took place at home in natural communication settings with the mother. Using an adaptation of Jakielski’s Index of Phonetic Complexity (IPC), we carried out an analysis to assess the phonetic complexity in all the three languages, of both produced and targeted words by two groups of children aged between 16-20 months and 27-30 months. Expressive vocabulary size was estimated by using the Lebanese Trilingual Communicative Development Inventory – 16-30 months (IDC-L trilingue 16-30 mois). Our findings show that children’s IPC increases significantly with vocabulary size only at 16-20 months of age, at the lexical spurt stage. Moreover, we showed that although children’s actual productions’ IPC increases with age, its value is always inferior to that of target words in all the three languages, indicating that children still have articulatory limits. Furthermore, the cross-linguistic comparisons of children’s IPC scores of their produced words do not reveal any differences between languages showing that these children’s first lexical productions seem to be more influenced by articulatory constraints than by the ambient language. References Bellemmouche, H. (2016). Influence du développement phonologique et de l’input sur les premières productions lexicales d’enfants arabophones. Doctoral dissertation, Université Paul Valéry - Montpellier III ; Université Hadj Lakhdar (Batna, Algeria). Charlier-Bered, M., & Juhem, A. (2007). Evolution de la complexité phonético-phonologique et sélection lexicale chez des enfants français entre 12 et 27 mois. Master’s Thesis, Université Lyon 1. Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (1995). The articulatory basis of babbling. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 38(6), 1199-1211. Gayraud, F., Barkat-Defradas, M., Lahrouchi, M., & Hamed, M. B. (2018). Development of phonetic complexity in Arabic, Berber, English and French. Canadian Journal of Linguistics/Revue canadienne de linguistique, 63(4), 527-555. Jakielski, K. (2000). Quantifying phonetic complexity in words: An experimental index. Child phonology conference, Cedar Fallas, IA.


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